Pugliese Recipes

Pugliese Cuisine

Pugliese cuisine, essentially simple and humble, reflects the geography of the region, the many and varied cultures that have occupied this land, and the character of its inhabitants, who, historically, have largely been farmers, sheepherders and fishermen.

Considered the flattest region in Italy, Puglia’s vast plains are ideal for growing wheat, olives for olive oil, grapes for wine, and various vegetables. These crops, introduced by the Greeks and Romans, formed the base of the characteristically simple Pugliese cuisine.

The wheat grown in the region is used in Puglia’s famous dried pastas, which remain a main staple of the local gastronomy. Olive oil also continues to be extremely important to the region’s cuisine and economy, as Puglia is the largest producer of olive oil in Italy today.

When the region fell under Byzantine rule during the sixth century, it is believed that its occupiers introduced cheese and bread to the local cuisine. Spaniards too, left their own flavor, with dishes like tiella barese, which is made with rice, potato, and mussels, and which serves as a subtle nod to Spain’s famous paella. Along with the Greeks, Turkish rulers of Puglia are credited with influencing the regional desserts, which often feature almonds, honey, and candied fruit.

While Puglia’s vast plains have offered up fertile soil for the agricultural needs of different ruling cultures, the region’s rocky terrain has also historically made for ideal sheep and goat country. Even today, roast lamb is the historical symbol of feasting in Puglia, and is often eaten for Christmas, Easter and in celebration of baptisms and weddings.

Along with its ideal farmland, another major geographical influence on Puglia’s cuisine is its almost 500 miles of coastline, situated along the Adriatic and Ionian Seas. Oysters, mussels, octopus, squid, various types of fish and even sea urchins serve as main dishes and can also be found in the region’s pastas and soups.

Indeed, the gastronomical offerings of this southern stretch of Italy are quite diverse. This natural bounty of the land and sea is the focus of an unpretentious, authentic cuisine that reflects both the many cultures that have passed through the region as well as the modest lifestyle of its inhabitants.

Pugliese Cuisine

Pugliese cuisine, essentially simple and humble, reflects the geography of the region, the many and varied cultures that have occupied this land, and the character of its inhabitants, who, historically, have largely been farmers, sheepherders and fishermen.

Considered the flattest region in Italy, Puglia’s vast plains are ideal for growing wheat, olives for olive oil, grapes for wine, and various vegetables. These crops, introduced by the Greeks and Romans, formed the base of the characteristically simple Pugliese cuisine.

The wheat grown in the region is used in Puglia’s famous dried pastas, which remain a main staple of the local gastronomy. Olive oil also continues to be extremely important to the region’s cuisine and economy, as Puglia is the largest producer of olive oil in Italy today.

When the region fell under Byzantine rule during the sixth century, it is believed that its occupiers introduced cheese and bread to the local cuisine. Spaniards too, left their own flavor, with dishes like tiella barese, which is made with rice, potato, and mussels, and which serves as a subtle nod to Spain’s famous paella. Along with the Greeks, Turkish rulers of Puglia are credited with influencing the regional desserts, which often feature almonds, honey, and candied fruit.

While Puglia’s vast plains have offered up fertile soil for the agricultural needs of different ruling cultures, the region’s rocky terrain has also historically made for ideal sheep and goat country. Even today, roast lamb is the historical symbol of feasting in Puglia, and is often eaten for Christmas, Easter and in celebration of baptisms and weddings.

Along with its ideal farmland, another major geographical influence on Puglia’s cuisine is its almost 500 miles of coastline, situated along the Adriatic and Ionian Seas. Oysters, mussels, octopus, squid, various types of fish and even sea urchins serve as main dishes and can also be found in the region’s pastas and soups.

Indeed, the gastronomical offerings of this southern stretch of Italy are quite diverse. This natural bounty of the land and sea is the focus of an unpretentious, authentic cuisine that reflects both the many cultures that have passed through the region as well as the modest lifestyle of its inhabitants.